Coast-to-coast ride for Roy

Danny Fowler (in the SKY vest)with members of his sponsored cycling team who are to do a ride in september. They are pictured on a practice ride from the Five Bells at Morton EMN-160619-171002009
Danny Fowler (in the SKY vest)with members of his sponsored cycling team who are to do a ride in september. They are pictured on a practice ride from the Five Bells at Morton EMN-160619-171002009

A group of cyclists from Bourne are planning a gruelling 160-mile ride across the country to raise cash for charity in honour of well-known former bus driver Roy Vickers.

Roy, 65, who worked for Delaine for 20 years, was diagnosed with motor neurone disease 18 months ago and can now barely move or speak. He is being cared for at home in Elsea Park by wife Joy.

The family are trying to stay positive and Roy’s three sons-in-law – Danny Fowler, Adam Lees and Michael O’Sullivan – are currently training for a coast-to-coast bike ride to raise funds for The Motor Neurone Disease Association.

Together with a group of friends, on Friday, September 23, the trio will set off from Whitehaven, Cumbria towards Sunderland, Tyne and Wear. The journey, which will see them climb up to 1,900ft above sea level in the Pennines, is expected to take three days.

Danny, 45, from St Gilbert’s Road, Bourne, is married to Roy’s daughter Shelley. He said the group have been training hard for the challenge and hopes to raise at least £5,000 through sponsorship.

He said: “When Roy fell ill initially it was thought he’d had a stroke, but he was later diagnosed with motor neurone disease.

“Around 18 months ago he was up and about, but now he’s bed-ridden and has very limited mobility. We decided we’d all like to raise some money for The Motor Neurone Disease Association and a coast-to-coast cycle seemed a good idea.

“I did the route two years ago to support Willoughby School and it was horrendous – so tough in fact that I said I’d never do it again. But since Roy has been ill I’ve changed my mind.

“Most of us aren’t particularly keen cyclists, but we’ve been training really hard for the challenge.”

Motor neurone disease is a progressive disease that attacks the motor neurones, or nerves, in the brain and spinal cord. This means messages gradually stop reaching muscles, which leads to weakness and wasting. MND can affect how you walk, talk, eat, drink and breathe.

To make a donation at www.justgiving.com/
fundraising/lovingthelycra