Children have a feel-good day in MADD world of art

Millie Catherall, Lucy Parker and Harriet Smith in a scene from Bourne Grammar School's sixth form play, Female Personality of the Year, as performed at the MADD evening this term.  Photo by Samantha Dundee.
Millie Catherall, Lucy Parker and Harriet Smith in a scene from Bourne Grammar School's sixth form play, Female Personality of the Year, as performed at the MADD evening this term. Photo by Samantha Dundee.
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SHOW REVIEW: Madd (Music, Art, Drama, Dance) Evening, Bourne Grammar School

Tears for Fears’ first UK hit was “Mad World” in 1982 and Bourne Grammar School took it all too literally at the end of the summer term.

An extract from the song reads: “All around me are familiar faces, bright and early for their daily races, children waiting for the day they feel good, made to feel the way that every child should”.

In what was described as “a most remarkable MADD evening”, Bourne Grammar School stars brought the house down with music, drama, dance and a display of artwork by students who created very personal masterpieces in their own time.

Headmaster Jonathan Maddox described it as “quite possibly the finest MADD evening I have seen in my 12 years at Bourne Grammar School”, with five-star performances from nearly 40 acts.

Highlights included Molly Welling’s cello recital of Faure and Stanley Godfrey’s interpretation of Grieg’s Piano Sonata in E minor, classical ballet from Phoebe and Eleanor Leadbeater, Indian dancing from Julia Chetian, Sanya Narang and Trisha Subudhi, along with stand-up comic Josh Dilley.

Year 10 student Emily Key plays and sings at Bourne Grammar School's "most remarkable" MADD evening.  Photo by Samantha Dundee.

Year 10 student Emily Key plays and sings at Bourne Grammar School's "most remarkable" MADD evening. Photo by Samantha Dundee.

Mr Maddox said: “The MADD formula is more or less the same but over the years, there have been refinements and experiments, including running the event over several evenings.

“This year, the school went for a single, substantial evening of exceptional quality with nearly 40 acts, taking in every year group from Year 7 students - on stage for the first time - to the deeply impressive, finished product of our Year 13 leavers.

“We enjoyed the very finest that our school has to offer in music, drama and dance, with fine art represented too by the now traditional display of our students’ artwork, enjoyed by the audience over drinks and ice cream at the interval.

“I cannot recall such a rich variety of acts, one after the other, of such very high quality.

I cannot recall such a rich variety of acts, one after the other, of such very high quality - quite possibly the finest MADD evening I have seen in my 12 years at Bourne Grammar School

Headmaster Jonathan Maddox, Bourne Grammar School

“We enjoyed exquisite music-making from our most accomplished classical musicians, confident student bands, beautifully performed solo and duet songs, sharing with us the fruits of hours of preparation together.

“We had dances galore of the most refined standard, classical ballet showcased by polished and refined performances, several talented students impressed us with finessed solo dance numbers and we enjoyed some magnificently performed classical Indian dance from students in fine, traditional costumes.

“Some of our most accomplished Year 13 performers returned to give several scenes from this year’s sixth form play, Female Personality of the Year, showing the standard to which students can rise after many years of hard work and regular performing which was all really impressive.

“It was an evening to remember and the best possible way to round off the school year.”

Freya Briggs and Jade Cox give their ballet recital at Bourne Grammar School's MADD evening this term.  Photo by Samantha Dundee.

Freya Briggs and Jade Cox give their ballet recital at Bourne Grammar School's MADD evening this term. Photo by Samantha Dundee.

What a note for the school’s director of music Charlotte Coggin to go out on after a seven-year stay.

Review by Winston Brown