Questionnaires to be sent out on Stamford and Bourne neighbourhood plans

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Two groups behind town neighbourhood plans are preparing to send out questionnaires so people can have their say on future development.

Stamford First, which is leading the creation of Stamford’s neighbourhood plan is encouraging local residents to complete the first of a series of questionnaires.

Chairman of the group David Taylor said: “Our initial questionnaire is designed to help ensure that our group is heading in the right direction from the outset, enabling residents to help us shape our vision and objectives for the plan.

“I urge everyone to engage in this process and take just a few minutes of their time to complete our survey.”

The questionnaire is available on-line via the StamfordFirst website, with links posted via social media, and as a hard copy from the Town Hall or Arts Centre.

A further and more detailed questionnaire for residents will be issued in July and will cover a much broader range of issues and seek views on highways and transport, the local economy, tourism, heritage and the environment, housing and education.

To find out more about the group or to get involved e-mail stamfordfirstuk@gmail.com

Every household in Bourne will also soon be receiving a questionnaire encouraging people to have their say on the area’s future development.

For the past 12 months, a committee of volunteers has been carrying out preparatory work on a neighbourhood plan for the parish of Bourne – which includes the town itself, plus Cawthorpe, Dyke and Twenty.

A neighbourhood plan is a planning document that allows a community to set out a vision for its local area.

It is led by local residents and the business community, not the council, and is about building neighbourhoods – not stopping growth. Once adopted, a neighbourhood plan must be taken into account during consideration of planning applications.

Ian Sismey, clerk to Bourne Town Council, said questionnaires will be delivered to every household in the parish.

He said: “It’s really important that those who live in the parish engage with the process and get involved. Their input could make a real difference.”