McGregors set to hit £100,000 at coffee morning

Annual McGregor coffee morning at Bourne Corn Exchange.  Margaret and Michael McGregor.'Photo: MSMP281113-010ow ENGEMN00120131128125834

Annual McGregor coffee morning at Bourne Corn Exchange. Margaret and Michael McGregor.'Photo: MSMP281113-010ow ENGEMN00120131128125834

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A couple who started raising funds for charity when their late son was diagnosed with leukaemia are likely to reach the £100,000 mark this month.

Dr Michael and Margaret McGregor have been organising events in aid of Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research, now known as Bloodwise, for more than 30 years and have so far raised more than £98,000.

Each event raises about £4,000, so it is highly likely they will reach £100,000 at the next coffee morning at Bourne Corn Exchange from 10am to 1pm on Thursday, November 26.

The couple began hosting small events when their son John was diagnosed with leukaemia. He sadly died in 1985 but Michael and Margaret kept raising money, moving from their home to cricket pavilions and church halls before finally taking over the Corn Exchange.

The McGregors are well aware of the upcoming milestone, but prefer to focus on the good that their ongoing donations can do.

Michael said: “It doesn’t matter how much we raise. It’s all going to a good cause.

“The research side of things is very important. They have made great strides.”

When the McGregors started raising money, not much was known about leukaemia. That has changed over the 30 years since.

“Now people know what it is all about,” said Michael. “Most people have come across someone who has had a connection with it. More and more people have been treated successfully.

“Seeing that makes it all worthwhile. That’s what it’s about. We saw the other end of it in losing our son. But the fact that there are so many people who have been successfully treated is great. We meet them and come across them. Leukaemia doesn’t have the mystery that it used to.”

The Bourne community has always rallied around the couple, and they will have about 60 loyal helpers on stalls, serving coffees and donating all sorts to sell.

“People have been absolutely amazing,” said Michael. “The things they bring on the day mean we are able to keep going.

“From our point of view, as long as we can help we shall continue to do so.”