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Your News: Students introduced to the world of economics

Bourne Grammar School pupils outside the London Metal Exchange. Back, from left, Nathan Denial, Alex Wheatley, Robbie Main, Philip Eames, Charles Legge, Oliver Harris. Front, Matthew Hartley, Charles Hick

Bourne Grammar School pupils outside the London Metal Exchange. Back, from left, Nathan Denial, Alex Wheatley, Robbie Main, Philip Eames, Charles Legge, Oliver Harris. Front, Matthew Hartley, Charles Hick

Economy students were given a rare insight into the world’s leading economic information and analysis business during a day’s visit to Bloomberg’s London office.

The visit was hosted by Bourne Grammar School parent Mr Ian Waddell, a senior commodity derivatives specialist at the company, who provided a day of activities that included a tour of the six-storey building led by a member of staff recently appointed through the company’s internship programme and a two hour training session with Mr Waddell using the Bloomberg information systems.

Following the session which allowed the students to gain an insight into the application of the economic theory they had learnt in class to the real world business environment, student Charles Legge of Bourne said: “The scale of the data available to a business analyst was incredible. I understand now how critical accurate information is in economic decisions”.

Bourne Grammar’s Head of Economics, Matthew Hartley told us: “It’s not every day students get the chance to see how the application of theory results in multi-million pound business transactions, and how the Bloomberg information system supports a huge range of businesses on a global scale.”

Commenting on Bloomberg’s company philosophy, Student Oliver Harris said: “I was really impressed by how the transparent ethos of the company was reflected in every aspect of their business”.

The visit to Bloomberg concluded with a presentation on the Bloomberg internship programme and the widely-respected Bloomberg Aptitude Test (BAT).

The results from this test allow students to compare themselves anonymously against their peers around the world, and may inform employment decisions as potential employers can interrogate the results and approach potential future employees.

The students also visited the London Metal Exchange, one of the few remaining open-call exchanges in Europe.

The students observed the deeply competitive environment of a trading floor and discussed the pros and cons of this compared to a technology-led exchange. Student Philip Eames said “I found the international scale of their operation surprising; it was astonishing that so much of the world’s metal supplies went through the hands of so few people.”

Summing up the day, student Nathan Denial said: “I was really impressed by the range of uses for the Bloomberg system, and this has opened my eyes to the diverse application of information in the economic world”.

 

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