Decision on 240-homes plan for Market Deeping is deferred by council

Housing news.
Housing news.

A plan to build 240 homes in Market Deeping has been delayed after councillors decided to defer on Tuesday.

Fourteen reasons were given for deferring the Larkfleet Homes plan for the site between Northfield Road and Towngate East with traffic, access to the site and density and character of the properties among them.

The plan includes road access from both Northfield Road and Towngate East, pedestrian and cycle links, public open space with playareas and landscaping.

Access to the south of the site from Towngate East has been among the most controversial aspects of the plan as traffic would come out on to a busy road near the roundabout junction with Godsey Lane.

Ashley Baxter, district councillor for Market and West Deeping, spoke as an objector to the development control ommittee at South Kesteven District Council. He said he had no problem with the principle of the design, saying the site would be built upon sooner or later. But he said there was a ‘flawed’ analysis of the traffic situation.

Coun Baxter said: “The access to the south of the site should be moved to the west so it is much further away from the mini roundabout at the top of Godsey Lane. Putting a site access for 240 houses so close to this roundabout is downright irresponsible.”

Anne Nott, representing Towngate East residents, also agreed with this view.

Coun Baxter said a 30mph limit should be placed on Northfield Road when the estate is built. He also said it looked like the main playarea in the plan had been ‘crowbarred’ in and that, after several changes, the current plan looked like a ‘barracks-style’ development.

Market Deeping town councillor Pauline Redshaw told the committee that concerns about access had been raised ever since the first consultation in 2013. She said the report from the highways department, which has no objections to the plan, did not address their concerns.

Objector Pamela Steel said objectors had asked for two access points on Northfield Road instead of the one on to Towngate East for safety reasons and to prevent the estate being used as a rat run.

Mark Mann, representing Larkfleet, said the planned homes were of a ‘high quality design’ which in many cases would include use solar panels. There would also be a number of starter and affordable homes. The houses on the site would range from one bedroom to five.

Mr Mann said the application ‘demonstrated a commitment by Larkfleet to deliver these much needed homes’.

On deferring the decision, after a three-hour discussion, the committee also asked for a number of other aspects of the plan to be looked into including the possibility of extending footpaths on the edge of the site, a review of the comments made by the town council, and a look at how the biodiversity of the site could be improved. The NHS will also be approached to see if it would consider benefiting from a Section 106 agreement whereby the doctors’ surgery could receive money to help it expand. It was reported the NHS had earlier refused this.

Thirteen committee members voted in favour of deferring the decision and one abstained.