Skeleton headbutted man in fight

Grantham Magistrates Court
Grantham Magistrates Court
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A Halloween brawl saw a 29-year-old dressed up as a skeleton headbutt another man, before running away from police.

Stephen David McCall of The Gables, Bourne, pleaded guilty to common assault and to obstructing a constable in the execution of his duty, at the car park on Hereward Street, Bourne, on November 1.

Before Grantham magistrates on Monday, prosecutor Marie Stace read out a statement from the victim describing how they had gone outside of the Burghley Arms to see a fight underway in which his brother was being kicked on the floor.

He approached a man standing nearby who was wearing skeleton face paint, but was then headbutted. The victim put his arms to his head, and found they were covered in blood.

Police arrived at the scene at 12.30am, but as they went to handcuff the man dressed as a skeleton, later identified as McCall, he ran away. They located him at his address, where he had just cleaned his facepaint off, and he was arrested.

The headbutt victim had suffered a cut to his nose, and an MRI scan to his head at hospital revealed that there were no further injuries.

Chris Pye-Smith, defending, said McCall had been having a drink with his friends in the pub, and then gone outside to find the altercation already in progress.

He said that it was his friend that was being assaulted, and he got involved to protect them, before turning around to see the complainant standing very close to 
him.

Mr Pye-Smith said that this led McCall to believe he was in danger, and so he reacted in ‘over-excessive self-defence’ by headbutting him.

“In that split second he reacted in that way. He just didn’t think,” said Mr Pye-Smith, while adding that he had also panicked when approached by the police with handcuffs.

Mr Pye-Smith told the court this his client had been through a difficult time recently, having been let go from his job as an oil rig worker in the North Sea five months ago. He now depends on agency work.

For the common assault McCall was fined £400, which he must pay on top of a £100 fine for resisting the Pc, £85 in prosecution costs, a £40 victim surcharge, and £100 in compensation to the victim.