Addie Harrison celebrates 100th Birthday milestone

Addie Harrison, front centre, celebrating her 100th birthday with family and friends at Qu'Appelle Care Home, Bourne
Addie Harrison, front centre, celebrating her 100th birthday with family and friends at Qu'Appelle Care Home, Bourne

Addie Harrison has lived through two world wars, the Great Depression and half a dozen recessions.

Life must have been hard being in service and working on a farm, and picking potatoes in all weather.

Yet the 100-year-old, who celebrated the milestone on Tuesday, says she is “lucky” and has nothing to complain about.

Addie was born on November 27, 1913 in Aslackby. At the age of 13 she finished school and went in to service working for a farming family in Swaton, Lincolnshire.

“I used to have to light the fire at 5.45am then get the four children of the house ready for school,” she said.

Cooking, cleaning and working on the farm were all part of the daily routine for six years.

She met her future husband William, a neighbour, when she was 14 and the pair married five years later and set up home in the same village.

Addie’s two sons Raymond, now 79, from Stamford and William, 80, from Scotland, grandson Kevin, 51, from Brant Broughton, Lincolnshire, along with a dozen members of the extended family joined in the celebrations at Qu’appelle Residential Care Home, in Bourne, where she now
lives.

“She was a brilliant cook,” said William, who admits life for his mum would not have been easy.

It’s not a view Addie shares, however.

“Hard work didn’t kill me,” she said.

Although she admits “we never had any money”.

To supplement her income from farm work and potato picking Addie took in ironing the dress shirts of American servicemen who were 
based at nearby RAF Folkingham during the Second World War.

Addie, who was widowed at the age of 80, lived in her own home until two and a half years ago, when she moved to Qu’appelle.

She also carried on working until the age of 70 - picking potatoes at farms in the region along with groups of women.

The reasons why she has lived a long healthy life she says were because “I worked hard” and “I was always positive about everything”.

Despite struggling a little to walk and hear well, positivity is a quality Addie still possesses in bucket fulls.

“I have trouble hearing, but my brain still works fine,” she said. “I’m very lucky. There are some others who are not as lucky.”